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question #1, #2 and #10

on Wed Mar 07, 2018 9:28 pm
I'm having difficulty knowing how to study for question #1. Do any of you have a good system? SO far I've tried flash cards, but I feel like the vowels are so similar in manner I can't differentiate between them.

As for question #2, I don't remember the book or power-points talking about phonotatic rules. Did any of you pick up on these rules?

Last, do you know what names in history our professor might want us to know?

Thanks,

Kelli
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Response to questions

on Thu Mar 08, 2018 5:37 pm
Hi Kelly! I had the same difficulty for question 1. Theres so much information. I think flash cards is best, maybe making a mnemonic for the manners of articulation?

I'm also stuck on the history of phonetics and phonotactic rules as well. For the rules, check out page 8 in the text it talks about the rule-governed ordering of patterning speech sounds.

LaChana
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Phonotactic rules

on Thu Mar 08, 2018 5:50 pm
Rule: /ɪ/ is a lax vowel and “cannot” occur in syllable-final position, except in Midwest dialect.
Rule: /ɛ/ is a lax vowel and “cannot” occur in final position. Exceptions: /jɛ/ (“yeah”)and some other colloquialisms.
Rule: /æ/ is a lax vowel and “cannot” occur in syllable-final position.
Rule: /ə/. This is the most common phoneme in the language. It is used only in unstressed syllables.
Rule: Approximants can occur only before vowels, never at the end of a word.
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Re: question #1, #2 and #10

on Thu Mar 08, 2018 6:58 pm
6. The kinds of information conveyed by human speech.

I feel like this is a simple question that I'm overthinking. Obviously the kinds of information conveyed by human speech includes everyday conversation right?

5. The constraints of anatomy and physiology on the production of speech sounds.
^For this one I just want to make sure I'm not missing any key pieces, the answers I have include the differences in constriction of the vocal tract with vowels compared to consonants.

11. The physiology of: pitch change, increased loudness of voice, whisper, falsetto voice, affricates, approximants, nasals, respiration
^I've looked almost everywhere in the book for this one, but to no avail. Does anyone have any ideas?

Still stuck on #9 as well with the names in history. Was thinking maybe it could be related to when the IPA was created, or who first began to use phonetics and why?
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Re: question #1, #2 and #10

on Thu Mar 08, 2018 8:21 pm
For question #6 I found a place in the book that said speech conveys mood, language, identity and region of the speaker
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Re: question #1, #2 and #10

on Thu Mar 08, 2018 8:34 pm
For the physiology of pitch change I know that the book talks about it in the second chapter. For example, when the vocal folds are lengthened a higher pitch is created and the vocal folds have a higher frequency. When the vocal folds are short, there is a slower vibratory frequency and a lower pitch.

When more air (subglottal air pressure) is pushed through the vocal folds there is the perception of a louder speech sounds.

Nasals happen when the velo-pharyngeal port is closed and allows the nasal cavity to resonate

The physiology of respiration is explained on pg 29 of the book under the title "the phonatory system".

I know a whisper is created with no vibration from the vocal chords...but that's all I know.

Falsetto voice? yeah I'm not sure. I'd just google it.

Approximants are the manner of articulation where two articulators come close to one another and create constriction in the vocal tract. They don't come together as closely as a fricative does, the opening in the mouth is a little bit wider. L,R,W, and J are approximants.

Affricates are a manner of articulation that has a stop-plosive phase and a homorganic fricative phase as well.
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Re: question #1, #2 and #10

on Fri Mar 09, 2018 2:13 pm
Hey Guys--
For question #1 I found it extremely helpful to take all the charts in the book and combine them into a single table with all the info as a quick reference. Here's an example of what I mean.... (I had to paste a portion of it in Paint, so idk how the quality will be):
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Re: question #1, #2 and #10

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